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Department for Environment, Food, and Rural Affairs

Contribution to the Minamata Convention on Mercury

Disclaimer: The data for this page has been produced from IATI data published by Department for Environment, Food, and Rural Affairs. Please contact them (Show Email Address) if you have any questions about their data.

Project Data Last Updated: 27/09/2019

IATI Identifier: GB-GOV-7-INTSUB010-MIN

Description

This activity supports the UK's annual contribution to the Minamata Convention on Mercury which is a global treaty to protect human health and the environment from the adverse effects of mercury. The Convention draws attention to a global and ubiquitous metal that, while naturally occurring, has broad uses in everyday objects and is released to the atmosphere, soil and water from a variety of sources. Controlling the anthropogenic releases of mercury throughout its lifecycle has been a key factor in shaping the obligations under the Convention. Major highlights of the Minamata Convention include a ban on new mercury mines, the phase-out of existing ones, the phase out and phase down of mercury use in a number of products and processes, control measures on emissions to air and on releases to land and water, and the regulation of the informal sector of artisanal and small-scale gold mining. The Convention also addresses interim storage of mercury and its disposal once it becomes waste, sites contaminated by mercury as well as health issues. The Minamata Convention on Mercury, under Article 13, sets up a Specific International Programme to support capacity building and technical assistance. The Programme is expected to improve the capacity of developing-country Parties and Parties with economies in transition to implement their obligations under the Convention.

Status - Implementation More information about project status
Project Spend More information about project funding
Participating Organisation(s) More information about implementing organisation(s)
Sectors

Sectors groups as a percentage of country budgets according to the Development Assistance Committee's classifications.

Budget

A comparison of forecast spend and the total amount of money spent on the project to date.

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