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Search Results for: "London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine"

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Now showing projects 20 of 20

Support to Rural Water Supply, Sanitation & Hygiene in Tanzania

UK Department for International Development

“To improve the health and socio-economic status of poor people by providing access to clean water, sanitation and hygiene services in rural areas of Tanzania. This will benefit 2.8 million people. This contributes towards our MDGs by supporting development of water infrastructure and promotion of hygiene and sanitation services. And will result in sustainability of water and sanitation services by 2022.”

Project Identifier: GB-1-204033
Activity Status: Implementation
Start Date: 16-06-2014
Total Budget: £150,099,996

Ross fund portfolio – Implementation research into infectious diseases

UK Department for International Development

This programme in the Ross Fund Portfolio (which focusses on neglected tropical diseases, diseases of emerging resistance and diseases of epidemic potential) aims to build the evidence based on effective interventions and delivery mechanisms to tackle infectious diseases in low and middle income countries. The research programmes will take an integrated and multi-disciplinary approach to help DFID and the development community better understand what works most effectively to tackle infectious diseases, building upon the existing evidence base. The research addresses a number of core themes, including delivery through health systems, value for money of interventions, vulnerable groups, gender and building evidence on interventions in a range of contexts including (but not limited to) fragile and conflict affected states.

Project Identifier: GB-GOV-1-300342
Activity Status: Implementation
Start Date: 20-12-2016
Total Budget: £59,851,304

Disability Inclusive Development Programme

UK Department for International Development

This programme will deliver a set of interventions to support people with disabilities in a number of developing countries. The programme will deliver tangible outcomes for people with disabilities including access to education, jobs, healthcare and reduced stigma and discrimination and encourage global actors to prioritise the issue. The programme will also test innovative approaches to disability inclusion and generate high quality research to fill gaps and discover what works in this under-resourced area. A lack of attention and funding has severely limited evidence of what works to deliver inclusion in international development for approximately 800 million people with disabilities in developing countries. Interventions that work will be scaled up, widening their reach, and new learning and evidence shared across the global development community and national governments.

Project Identifier: GB-GOV-1-300397
Activity Status: Implementation
Start Date: 05-12-2017
Total Budget: £36,999,994

Research Programme Consortia: Health research – filling the gaps in evidence in infectious diseases, health systems and vulnerable groups

UK Department for International Development

This programme in the Ross Fund Portfolio (which focusses on neglected tropical diseases, diseases of emerging resistance and diseases of epidemic potential) aims to build the evidence based on effective interventions and delivery mechanisms to tackle infectious diseases in low and middle income countries. The research programmes will take an integrated and multi-disciplinary approach to help DFID and the development community better understand what works most effectively to tackle infectious diseases, building upon the existing evidence base. The research addresses a number of core themes, including delivery through health systems, value for money of interventions, vulnerable groups, gender and building evidence on interventions in a range of contexts including (but not limited to) fragile and conflict affected states.

Project Identifier: GB-GOV-1-300352
Activity Status: Implementation
Start Date: 16-05-2017
Total Budget: £32,600,000

Centre of Excellence For Development of Impact and Learning (CEDIL)

UK Department for International Development

The project will establish a Centre of Excellence for Impact Evaluation. The Centre will provide a range of services to strengthen the evidence base for what does or does not work in international development. It will address gaps in existing evaluation practice areas, and maximise the effectiveness of UK funded international development by delivering high quality policy relevant studies of specific programmes and themes and by providing technical and policy advice to DFID and developments partners on better use of impact evaluation as well as developing and testing new and innovative approaches to impact evaluation.

Project Identifier: GB-1-203569
Activity Status: Implementation
Start Date: 15-09-2013
Total Budget: £19,999,994

SHARE - Sanitation and Hygiene Research Programme.

UK Department for International Development

SHARE is designed to generate, synthesize, and translate applied research related to sanitation and hygiene in low-income settings. Its purpose is to contribute to achieving universal access to effective, sustainable and equitable sanitation and hygiene through the use of better data and evidence based approaches. The consortium is unique in its combination of internationally recognized expertise, scientific research institutions, policy research, and implementation through national Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) programmes which engage communities in local decision making affecting sanitation and hygiene. This diversity has provided a range of approaches to developing knowledge and identifying opportunities to use this knowledge to create change..

Project Identifier: GB-1-114396
Activity Status: Implementation
Start Date: 17-02-2009
Total Budget: £16,795,432

Neglected Tropical Diseases Implementation Research Programme (NIRP)

UK Department for International Development

This investment will contribute towards the ultimate goal of achieving the World Health Organisation 2020 Neglected Tropical Disease (NTD) control and elimination targets through the conduct of implementation research alongside the delivery of Integrated NTD Control Programmes on the ground. The research will inform the on-going and future design of cost-effective, sustainable NTD control programmes and their integration within the wider health system at scale.

Project Identifier: GB-1-203089
Activity Status: Implementation
Start Date: 29-07-2013
Total Budget: £11,333,970

UK Public Health Rapid Support Team - Research

UK - Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC)

The UK Public Health Rapid Support Team (UK-PHRST) has the following main objectives: 1) Within ODA eligible countries to support the rapid investigation and response to disease outbreaks at source, with the aim of stopping a public health threat becoming a health emergency. 2) Conduct rigorous research to aid epidemic preparedness and response and improve future response. 3) Generate an evidence base for best practice in disease outbreak interventions within ODA eligible countries. 4) Train a cadre of public health reservists for the UK-PHRST who can be rapidly deployed to respond to disease outbreaks. 5) Build capacity in-country for an improved and rapid national response to disease outbreaks and contribute to supporting implementation of the International Health Regulations (IHR).

Project Identifier: GB-GOV-10-UKPHRST-LSHTM
Activity Status: Implementation
Start Date: N/A
Budget: £10,000,000

Sustaining Action on Nutrition

UK Department for International Development

Building the foundations for sustainable government and business action on nutrition by strengthen the role of civil society, government and business accountability, by improving government food systems policy and helping leverage business investments in nutrition.

Project Identifier: GB-GOV-1-300590
Activity Status: Implementation
Start Date: 18-05-2018
Total Budget: £7,999,994

Innovative Metrics in Agriculture and Nutrition

UK Department for International Development

To generate high quality evidence linking agriculture and nutrition by undertaking research which will help drive more effective investments by DFID and others and contribute to DFID's efforts to prevent stunting in 20 million children by 2020 in Africa and South Asia.

Project Identifier: GB-1-203806
Activity Status: Implementation
Start Date: 07-05-2013
Total Budget: £7,190,319

Violence Against Women and Girls Research and Innovation Fund: VAWG in Conflict and Humanitarian Emergencies

International Rescue Committee

The programme seeks to build a more rigorous understanding of violence against women and girls in conflict and humanitarian emergencies and improved strategies to address it with an emphasis on identifying ‘what works' to keep women and girls safe.

Project Identifier: GB-CHC-1065972-DF104
Activity Status: Implementation
Start Date: 01-05-2014
Budget: £5,171,897

Violence Against Women and Girls Research and Innovation Fund: VAWG in Conflict and Humanitarian Emergencies

International Rescue Committee Inc.

The programme seeks to build a more rigorous understanding of violence against women and girls in conflict and humanitarian emergencies and improved strategies to address it with an emphasis on identifying ‘what works' to keep women and girls safe.

Project Identifier: US-EIN-13-5660870-DF104
Activity Status: Implementation
Start Date: 01-05-2014
Budget: £5,171,897

NF Indonesia IYCN PD

The Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition

NF Indonesia IYCN PD

Project Identifier: 30001-30ID01
Activity Status: Implementation
Start Date: N/A
Budget: Not Provided

Development of an intervention to support reproductive health of women after seeking medical abortion in Cambodia

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy

The aims of this partnership are to: 1. Develop a long-term research collaboration between the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) and the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) in field of mobile/digital health in LMICs, particularly in Southeast Asia. The goal of the partnership is to integrate findings, methods, and research projects from the public health field, the area of focus of LSHTM, with the regional, linguistic, and cultural expertise of SOAS. This grant would allow the two institutions to start a joint exploratory research project to test, in the field, how to integrate respective methods and perspectives while focusing on a specific research question. 2. Develop a joint research project between LSHTM and SOAS to study reproductive health after abortion and mobile phone use among factory workers in Cambodia from a medical, cultural, and information-sharing practices perspectives. The project responds to the problem of a decrease in interdisciplinary collaboration particularly evident in health-related research by bringing together three different approaches to researching health issues in LMICs: 1. public healthcare; 2. information circulation and sharing, and trust building among marginal communities; 3. linguistic and cultural adaptation of communication models. 3. Integrate project-based qualitative methods used in the medical field with the long-term orientated ethnographic methods and linguistic approaches from the humanities, to better understand the socio-cultural implications of digital technologies in healthcare in LMICs. In particular, the project aims at integrating ethnographic and linguistic research methods with Intervention Mapping (IM), a method commonly used in health research to develop health behaviour change interventions. IM is an iterative and cumulative process that consists of the following steps: (1) needs assessment; (2) specifying behavioural change to result from the intervention; (3) designing the intervention; (4) producing and refining the intervention content; (5) planning intervention implementation and (6) planning intervention evaluation. This project will focus on steps 1-4 and will bring a cultural, linguistic and sociological perspective to these phases.

Project Identifier: GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-AH/R006091/1
Activity Status: Implementation
Start Date: 01-10-2017
Budget: Not Provided

GCRF: RECAP - Research capacity building and knowledge generation to support preparedness and response to humanitarian crises and epidemics

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy

RECAP's vision is to strengthen research capacity and capability to generate knowledge on how to improve decision-making and accountability to help support preparedness and response to humanitarian crises and epidemics. RECAP will focus on the sectors of health and protection where synergies are currently underdeveloped, through 6 interconnected, interdisciplinary research Objectives/work-packages along with 4 capacity and capability building Objectives. The 6 research Objectives/work packages will also act as platforms for capacity building through applied research methods training. The 6 research objectives are to: 1. Develop, pilot and evaluate the application of improved metrics for agency and sector performance in humanitarian settings. 2. Develop and apply new modelling techniques for epidemic preparedness and response to guide real-time decision-making. 3. Develop and apply economic methods to inform decision-making in humanitarian settings. 4. Evaluate the current use of data and evidence in operational decision-making and the potential for innovative decision-making approaches and technologies in humanitarian settings. 5. Explore accountability frameworks and enforcement mechanisms in humanitarian settings. 6. Explore and support ethical preparedness and provision in humanitarian crises. The 4 capacity and capability building Objectives are: 7. Training on specific research methods linked to the research conducted in RECAP. 8. Institutional capacity building for a sustainable and supportive research environment. 9. Supporting individual researcher capability and career progression. 10. Building UK capability in research on health and protection in humanitarian crises.

Project Identifier: GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-ES/P010873/1
Activity Status: Implementation
Start Date: 01-10-2017
Budget: Not Provided

Can community-wide active case finding for tuberculosis and universal testing and treatment for HIV control the African tuberculosis epidemic?

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy

Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease, which is spread when the bacteria causing TB is released into the air by TB cases when they cough. Globally one third of the worlds population is infected with TB and 9 million new cases of disease, with 1.5 million deaths occurred in 2013. Only 1 in 10 individuals infected with TB goes on to develop disease but the risk is much higher in individuals who have a weakened immune system such as those infected with HIV. Because of the overlap between HIV and TB, sub-Saharan Africa has the highest rate of TB disease. But, with increasing globalisation and travel, this has also translated into increasing rates in other parts of the world such as the UK. Therefore preventing TB in sub-Saharan Africa helps countries devastated by this disease, and also decreases the risk of TB worldwide. To control TB a consistent decrease in the number of new cases and improved TB case outcomes (e.g. less deaths) are needed in the whole population. There is no effective vaccine against TB. However, if TB cases are identified earlier and started on effective treatment, before they normally present to healthcare, TB spread to others could be reduced. Active case finding for TB (ACF) involves systematically screening the whole population for TB disease and starting cases on treatment. This benefits the individual and should decrease the number of new cases by decreasing the spread of TB. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) improves a HIV-infected person's immune function and decreases their susceptibility to TB. Therefore if rolled-out widely to those who need it, ART should decrease the number of new TB cases. However to date, we don't have any strong evidence to show that ACF and ART can control TB in populations. HPTN071 is a large trial being conducted in 21 Zambian and South African communities, two countries devastated by TB and HIV, by the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine in the UK, Zambart in Zambia and the Desmond Tutu TB Centre in South Africa. In this trial 14 intervention communities receive a HIV prevention package administered to the entire population and 7 control communities receive usual care. In the intervention communities, from 2014-2018, all adults and children are tested annually for HIV ("universal testing"). ART is started immediately in 7 communities ("universal treatment") and according to national guidelines in 7 communities. The trial will determine if new HIV infections can be decreased by this strategy of universal test and treat. To measure this, the study will follow 52500 adults aged 18-44 years for 3 years from all 21 communities, and compare the number of new HIV infections in the intervention and control communities. Given the TB problem in these communities, all individuals in the intervention communities are also asked about TB symptoms (e.g. cough, night sweats etc). If symptoms are reported, sputum is collected and tested for TB, with referral to local TB clinics for treatment. HPTN071 therefore combines community-wide ACF for TB and ART for HIV. It provides a unique opportunity to study if these interventions together can decrease the number of new TB cases and improve the clinical outcomes of TB cases. This proposed project will use information from the HPTN071 trial as well as the national TB records for these communities to see if the number of new TB cases have reduced in the intervention communities compared to the control communities, and also what the clinical outcomes for these patients are. A mathematical model will be used to better understand and tease out the effects of the two interventions. This project has the potential to change our approach to TB prevention in sub-Saharan Africa. It is an important study, which will make a major contribution in the fight against one of the most important diseases in the world.

Project Identifier: GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-MR/N020618/1
Activity Status: Implementation
Start Date: 01-08-2016
Budget: Not Provided

The Role of Complement Component C1Q in Tuberculosis and Diabetes Co-morbidity

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy

The objectives are: 1. To determine the role of C1q in controlling M. tuberculosis in healthy UK donors by a. finding the immune cellular source of C1q in peripheral blood mononuclear cells exposed to M. tuberculosis b. assessing the impact of C1q blockade and exogenous C1q on macrophage function, in terms of phagocytic uptake of M. tuberculosis and growth control, and polarisation and cytokine production c. analysing effect of C1q on global transcriptomic macrophage responses to M. tuberculosis 2. To determine whether uncomplexed C1q is elevated in T2DM and could feasibly link T2DM and TB by a. measuring C1q, adiponectin and C1q-adiponectin complexes in stored plasma from TB-T2DM, TB, T2DM and HC in Indonesia b. assessing whether cellular production of C1q in TB patients in Indonesia reflects that observed in healthy donors in UK c. assess whether C1q blockade and exogenous C1q impact the ability of T2DM patients' and healthy donors' macrophages to control M. tuberculosis in Indonesia

Project Identifier: GB-GOV-13-FUND--NEWT-MR/P017568/1
Activity Status: Implementation
Start Date: 01-09-2017
Budget: Not Provided

A one health approach to the investigation and control of MERS-CoV among camel and human populations in Jordan as a potential model for the region

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy

Foundation funding will thus be used over an initial two-year period to address existing key knowledge gaps through multidisciplinary research leading to: 1) An improved understanding of the relative importance of transmission routes for MERS-CoV from camels to humans. There is a significant gap in global research knowledge regarding the accurate understanding of specific risk factors and routes of disease transmission from camels to humans. To date there has been no research aimed at identifying which aspects of camel husbandry, camel food products and human interaction with camels are of particularly high risk. However, without this knowledge appropriate control measures to minimise the risk of camel-to-human disease transmission cannot be accurately identified. This research will therefore seek to address these knowledge gaps by conducting a cross-sectional survey, involving both serology and virus isolation (nasal & oropharyngeal swabs) together with the administration of pretested structured questionnaire to identify risk factors for infection among high risk Bedouin communities in the south of Jordan. 2) The identification of culturally acceptable measures to mitigate the risk of MERS-CoV transmission Camels occupy a unique and culturally iconic role in Islamic Arab society and culture. The Qur'an and Hadith (Islamic texts) describe how camels reflect the wisdom and power of God, together with the believed healing properties of camels' milk and urine. In addition, camels have until recent times represented the only means of surviving and maintaining a functioning society in the harsh desert environments such as the Arabian Peninsula - a fact which has also greatly elevated the status of camels in Arab culture, compared with other common livestock species in the region such as sheep and goats. With this in mind it is impossible to develop effective disease control strategies, including potential vaccination programmes, without an accurate understanding of these critical cultural issues. 3) The identification of knowledge gaps that should be the target of further research efforts and generation of key parameters for future disease transmission modelling. Objectives 1 and 2 listed above represent significant key knowledge gaps in the current understanding of MERS-CoV aetiology, epidemiology and control. However, as this study progresses new knowledge gaps will be generated. For example once key routes of transmission and their relative risk have been identified, the mechanism of these transmission routes is likely to require further investigation. Likewise the qualitative study, while addressing existing key knowledge gaps, will also inform future researchers in how best to target the specific issues raised. 4) The establishment of Jordan, through JUST, as a centre of excellence in MERS-CoV research, surveillance, control and training, able to serve the whole region. While the current MERS-CoV human epidemic in is largely centred on Saudi Arabia, MERS-CoV seropositivity has been identified in dromedary populations across the world. Jordan shares a long porous border with Saudi Arabia and research conducted by the RVC in collaboration with JUST and US NIAD / NIH, has identified high MERS-CoV endemicity among camel populations in Jordan and identified human pathogenic virus isolates from these same populations. Regional political tensions have given Jordan a unique position as a largely neutral, peaceful hub for regional training and dissemination of knowledge. This, combined with the existing OIE twinning initiative between RVC and JUST - and its associated collaboration with world experts in epidemiology and virology from LSHTM and US NIAD / NIH - provides a unique opportunity to develop JUST and Jordan as centre of excellence for MERS-CoV research surveillance, control and training, able to serve the entire region.

Project Identifier: GB-GOV-13-FUND--GCRF-MR/P02551X/1
Activity Status: Implementation
Start Date: 01-04-2017
Budget: Not Provided

Evaluating the impact of the Mais Médicos (More Doctors) programme in Brazil

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy

Providing access to comprehensive and high quality healthcare for all is key for Universal Health Coverage (UHC) and for achieving many of the United Nation's Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). However, the limited and uneven allocation of health professionals is undermining progress towards UHC in many low and middle income countries (LMICs). Understanding whether efforts to address shortages in health professionals are successful in improving access to healthcare in underserved areas and produce improvements in health outcomes is crucial for advancing the design of health policy in this area. Brazil is a country that has historically suffered large disparities in doctor availability with rural and poor areas having a much lower provision of doctors that wealthier, urban areas. This lack of doctors means that many vulnerable Brazilians are not benefiting from the country's internationally recognised model of primary health care delivery. In 2013, the Brazilian government launched a major programme called Programa Mais Médicos (PMM) or More Doctors programme to address acute shortages of doctors in the public health system in underserved areas. This was achieved by expanding medical school places, increasing investment in healthcare facilities, and through an "emergency expansion" of doctors in rural and poor areas. The latter has involved the allocation of over 17,000 doctors to 4,004 municipalities, with more than 60% of these doctors coming from Cuba as part of an international agreement. This unprecedented expansion of doctors in under-served areas may have important effects on health outcomes and health inequalities, in addition to wider health system impacts. To date, no robust evaluations of programme impacts have been undertaken, hampering learning from the programme for policymakers in Brazil and internationally. We will evaluate the "emergency expansion" component of PMM using national databases of hospitalisations and deaths which are routinely collected and by conducting interviews with national policy implementers and health system managers and doctors in two states of Brazil. Specifically, we will examine the reasons why some municipalities adopted the programme and others did not, which factors influenced whether the programme was successful in local settings and how access and use of health care services may have changed in response to the introduction of PMM doctors. We will examine if programme impacts differed by whether municipalities were allocated Brazilian or Cuban doctors. We will also examine whether the programme was associated with a reduction in hospital admissions and deaths, both in children and adults, and whether it reduced inequalities in health outcomes. The project is a collaboration between researchers based in Brazil (University of Brasilia and the Federal University of Paraiba) and in the UK (Imperial College and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine) who have extensive experience in evaluating health policy in LMICs using quantitative and qualitative methods. We will disseminate our findings through academic forums and have developed a plan to actively disseminate our work with key health policy makers in Brazil and internationally, through events planned with Federal and State Ministries of Health and the Pan-American Health Organisation (PAHO). Brazil is an eligible country for UK official development assistance (ODA). Many Brazilians cannot access quality healthcare services. This directly affects their welfare, and health needs continue to go unmet - particularly in the poorest and most vulnerable communities. Over 22% and 5% of the population live in poverty in Paraiba and the Federal District (the focus jurisdictions for our qualitative research) respectively, whilst 20% and 10% are illiterate. This project will evaluate the impact of an internationally importa nt HRH intervention on the health of some of Brazil's most vulnerable communities.

Project Identifier: GB-GOV-13-FUND--NEWT-MR/R022887/1
Activity Status: Implementation
Start Date: 01-04-2018
Budget: Not Provided

Using host-responses and pathogen genomics to improve diagnostics for tuberculosis in the Philippines

UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy

Tuberculosis (TB), caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is a major infectious disease in the Philippines. The overarching aim of the project is to develop a TB human blood transcriptome response assay risk score that could be used to identify active TB and evaluate treatment response in reducing active disease. We will utilise three clinics affiliated to the Research Institute for Tropical Medicine (RITM) to enrol more than 1,100 subjects, and assess the diagnostic developed, across different lineages and strains of M. tuberculosis, drug resistance profiles and patient HIV status. The assay developed will be compared to standard care diagnostic procedures undertaken at the RITM. This proposal will focus on four overlapping objectives, to: (1) Identify a transcriptomic signature of active TB in RITM patients; (2) Develop the transcriptomic signature into an in-house PCR-based assay; (3) Convert the PCR transcriptomic signature into a risk score protocol that could be utilised clinically; (4) Evaluate the performance of the risk score in identifying treatment failures; (5) Capacity-build RITM staff for performing genomic investigations and analysis. Success of the research proposal could lead to more informed protocols for treatment change that would be applicable to the Philippines and worldwide. The assays will be of a generic format and should be transferable to nano-scale reactions that could significantly increase the speed of the reaction, with greatly reduced cost, when suitable platform devices for this procedure are developed.

Project Identifier: GB-GOV-13-FUND--NEWT-MR/R025576/1
Activity Status: Implementation
Start Date: 01-10-2018
Budget: Not Provided

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